Essay contest poetry contest

7. WARRANTY AND INDEMNITY : Each Entrant agrees not to submit any Entry that infringes any 3rd party proprietary, intellectual property, industrial property, personal rights or other rights, including without limitation, copyright, trademark, patent, trade secret or confidentiality obligation or includes any personally identifiable information To the maximum extent permitted by law, each Entrant indemnifies and agrees to keep indemnified the Sponsor at all times from and against any liability, claims, demands, losses, damages, costs and expenses resulting from any act, default or omission of the Entrant and/or a breach of any warranty set forth herein. To the maximum extent permitted by law, each Entrant indemnifies and agrees to keep indemnified the Sponsor at all times from and against any liability, actions, claims, demands, losses, damages, costs and expenses for or in respect of which the Sponsor will or may become liable by reason of or related or incidental to any act, default or omission by an Entrant under these Official Rules including without limitation resulting from or in relation to any breach, non-observance, act or omission whether negligent or otherwise, pursuant to these official rules by an Entrant.

We’ve come the way the rabbits come
through brambles and raspberry bushes,
where everything is fiercely dark—a skein of black
stalks weaving above us, thistles the color of woodsmoke
under our palms. This part drops into a tunnel, a caved in road
from an age far past, holding tree roots, curled as if clinging
to the damp clay. My sister clutching me as we move, vision dotted
by berries, like gnats on a porch screen. The tiny hollow yields a needle
of light, after moments, and the gap widens, and we emerge. And there—
in the distance—the wind chimes we’ve hung on the wizened tree,
the smooth metal tolling against the ridges,
a welcome.

What to Submit
Poetry in any style or theme. Your entry should be your own original work. You may submit the same poem simultaneously to this contest and to others, and you may submit poems that have been published or won prizes elsewhere. (However, please do not submit work that has previously received recognition at Winning Writers.)

For the purpose of the Margaret Reid Prize, a poem in a traditional style employs regular meter and/or rhyme, or is written in a recognized poetic form. This includes traditional Western forms such as ballads, sonnets, and blank verse, and Asian forms such as tanka and haiku.

For your reference, this  Glossary of Poetic Terms  describes many forms. You may also enjoy sites for traditional and exotic forms of poetry found on our  resource pages .

Prizes and Publication
The $1,500  Tom Howard Prize  will be awarded for a poem in any style or genre.
The $1,500  Margaret Reid Prize  will be awarded for a poem that rhymes or has a traditional style.
Ten Honorable Mention awards of $100 each will also be made (any style).

All entries that win cash prizes will be published on the Winning Writers website and announced in the Winning Writers Newsletter (circulation 50,000+).

No Country Restriction; English Language
Poets of all nations may enter. However, the poems you submit should be in English. If you have written a poem in another language, you may translate your poem into English and submit the translation.

Anonymous Judging
Entries are judged anonymously. Please omit your name and all identifying information from your entry. Please also omit any publishing credits from your entry. All the information we need is collected on our online entry form.

No Age Restriction
Poets of all ages may enter.

Privacy
Your privacy is assured. We will not rent your information to third parties.

Copyright
If your entry wins any cash prize, you agree to give both John H. Reid and Winning Writers a nonexclusive license to publish your work online. This includes possible publication in one or more ebooks, with attribution. From time to time, selected winning entries may also be published in printed collections. If you win a prize, we may ask you for permission to include your entry in one of these books. You may accept or decline this invitation as you choose. Your entry will not be published in print without your consent, and you retain all other rights. You are free, for example, to publish your work in print or online elsewhere, and to enter it into other contests, whether or not you win a prize in this contest.

Refunds
Generally entry fees are not refundable. However, if you believe you have an exceptional circumstance, please  contact us  within one year of your entry.

Advisors to the Contest
John Howard Reid has won first prizes and other awards in prestigious literary events. A former journalist and magazine editor, he has published several historical novels, a collection of poetry, a guide to winning literary contests, and over fifty books of film criticism and movie history. See his work at  Lulu . He lives in Wyong, Australia. Mr. Reid is assisted by Dee C. Konrad. A leading educator and published author, Mrs. Konrad was Associate Professor in the English faculty of Barat College of DePaul University, and served as Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the year 2000-2001.

Read winning stories from past years:
Mikayla Ávila Vilá's Trumpeteers (2016)
Barbara Hamby's  Dole Girl  (2015)
Leslee Becker's  Severance  (2014)
Kerry-Lee Powell’s  There Are Two Pools You May Drink From  (2013)
Alexandra Thom’s  The Piano  (2012)
Kalpana Narayanan’s  Aviator on the Prowl  (2011)
Adam Sturtevant’s  How Do I explain?  (2010)
Jessica Treglia’s  Canceled  (2009)
Patricia Engel’s  Desaliento  (2008)
Padma Viswanathan’s  Transitory Cities  (2007)
Tiphanie Yanique’s  How to Escape from a Leper Colony  (2006)
Lisa Chipongian’s  Intramuros  (2005)
. Sulaitis’s  If It’s Anywhere, It’s Behind Us  (2004)
Gale Renee Walden’s  Men I Don’t Talk to Anymore  (2003)
Manini Nayar’s  Home Fires  (2002)
Kate Small’s  One Night a Year  (2001)
Girija Tropp’s  The Pretty Ones Have Their Uses  (2001)
Pauls Toutonghi’s  Regeneration  (2000)
Jacob M. Appel’s  Shell Game with Organs  (1999)
Kris Saknussemm’s  Unpracticed Fingers Bungle Sadly Over Tiny Feathered Bodies  (1998)
Kiki Delancey’s  Jules Jr Michael Jules Jr  (1997)
Mary Ann Jannazo’s  No Runs, No Hits, No One Left on Base  (1996)
Tom Paine’s  The Milkman & I  (1995)
Michael Dorris’s  Layaway  (1994)

Essay contest poetry contest

essay contest poetry contest

Read winning stories from past years:
Mikayla Ávila Vilá's Trumpeteers (2016)
Barbara Hamby's  Dole Girl  (2015)
Leslee Becker's  Severance  (2014)
Kerry-Lee Powell’s  There Are Two Pools You May Drink From  (2013)
Alexandra Thom’s  The Piano  (2012)
Kalpana Narayanan’s  Aviator on the Prowl  (2011)
Adam Sturtevant’s  How Do I explain?  (2010)
Jessica Treglia’s  Canceled  (2009)
Patricia Engel’s  Desaliento  (2008)
Padma Viswanathan’s  Transitory Cities  (2007)
Tiphanie Yanique’s  How to Escape from a Leper Colony  (2006)
Lisa Chipongian’s  Intramuros  (2005)
. Sulaitis’s  If It’s Anywhere, It’s Behind Us  (2004)
Gale Renee Walden’s  Men I Don’t Talk to Anymore  (2003)
Manini Nayar’s  Home Fires  (2002)
Kate Small’s  One Night a Year  (2001)
Girija Tropp’s  The Pretty Ones Have Their Uses  (2001)
Pauls Toutonghi’s  Regeneration  (2000)
Jacob M. Appel’s  Shell Game with Organs  (1999)
Kris Saknussemm’s  Unpracticed Fingers Bungle Sadly Over Tiny Feathered Bodies  (1998)
Kiki Delancey’s  Jules Jr Michael Jules Jr  (1997)
Mary Ann Jannazo’s  No Runs, No Hits, No One Left on Base  (1996)
Tom Paine’s  The Milkman & I  (1995)
Michael Dorris’s  Layaway  (1994)

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